Dawson Creek and District Hospital Replacement – Dawson Creek, BC

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Project Overview

We are building a new, state-of-the-art hospital in Dawson Creek to address current and future health and patient care needs.

The vision of the Dawson Creek & District Hospital (DCDH) Replacement Project is to create a model of excellence in health care that will incorporate modern best practices and standards for the hospital, as well as meet the future needs of the region.

The new hospital will improve the healing environment and provide culturally safe care for residents of the Northeast. It will benefit patients, families, physicians and staff through strengthened existing

Project Overview

We are building a new, state-of-the-art hospital in Dawson Creek to address current and future health and patient care needs.

The vision of the Dawson Creek & District Hospital (DCDH) Replacement Project is to create a model of excellence in health care that will incorporate modern best practices and standards for the hospital, as well as meet the future needs of the region.

The new hospital will improve the healing environment and provide culturally safe care for residents of the Northeast. It will benefit patients, families, physicians and staff through strengthened existing services. The project will support recruitment, retention, and engagement of health care workers and bring local economic benefits to the City of Dawson Creek, surrounding areas, and local Indigenous communities.

The new hospital will be approximately 24,500 square metres (263,000 square feet) and will include:

  • 24 additional beds, bringing the total up to 70 beds, all of which will be single rooms with ensuite washrooms.

  • An emergency department that is double the size of the existing one, with a treatment spaces increasing from 10 to 15.

  • Support for new moms and families through a perinatal unit including labour, delivery, recovery and post-partum rooms and a nursery.

  • Improved mental health service delivery with a new in-patient suite and an increase of beds from 15 to 18 plus two high observation rooms.

  • Space for a laboratory, medical imaging, and physical rehabilitation.

  • A range of surgical services as well as ambulatory care including cancer care, IV therapy, respiratory therapy, and visiting specialists.

  • A spiritual room for use by people of all faiths and cultures that can accommodate cultural ceremonies such as smudging.

  • Improved regional pharmacy services that meet the new National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities guidelines and requirements.

  • Culturally safe and welcoming spaces that are designed with input and feedback from surrounding Indigenous communities as well as the local community.

  • Increased parking capacity with over 300 parking stalls for patients, visitors, and staff.

The new DCDH is being built in Treaty 8 territory, the ancestral home of the Beaver, Cree, Saulteau, Sicannie (Sikanni), and Slavey.

Northern Health acknowledges the hospital serves the communities of Blueberry River First Nation, Doig River First Nation, Fort Nelson First Nation, Halfway River First Nation, Kelly Lake Communities, Prophet River First Nation, Saulteau First Nations, and West Moberly First Nations; as well as Métis, Inuit, and urban Indigenous populations within the Peace Region of Treaty 8 territory.

The budget for the project is approximately $590 million which will be shared by the provincial government, through Northern Health, and the Peace River Regional Hospital District.

  • Drone video of site of new hospital

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    Want a bird's eye view of the work that's underway on the new Dawson Creek & District Hospital? Check out this awesome drone video of the construction site!

    Watch the video here:

    Drone video - March 2024 | Videos | DCDH Replacement Project | Let's Talk Northern Health


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  • Career fair at Dawson Creek Secondary School

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    On Wednesday, March 13, School District 59 hosted a career fair at Dawson Creek Secondary School’s (DCSS) South Peace campus. They welcomed 400-600 students in Grades 10-12 to come through the gymnasium to engage with over 25 local organizations.

    Northern Health was invited to share information about volunteer opportunities, career paths, and the new Dawson Creek & District Hospital – which is currently under construction just up the street!

    It was exciting to hear that a lot of students are interested in pursuing an education or career in health care. Those who weren’t interested in working in the medical/clinical side of the industry were intrigued to hear that there are also non-clinical and support services positions available to support the delivery of health care services.

    In addition to employment opportunities with Northern Health, some of the students that are considering a career in the trades industry were interested to learn about the timeline for the construction of the new Dawson Creek & District Hospital – which will be complete in 2027.

    In a couple of months, a group of students from School District 59 will be also be participating in the Adventures in Health Care program in Dawson Creek and Fort St. John. These students will have the opportunity to tour facilities in the North and South Peace and get a sense of what it's like working for Northern Health.

    Throughout the event, we asked DCSS students and staff to submit one word to describe how they want the new Dawson Creek & District Hospital to look and feel. Here's what they told us:

    Attended on behalf of Northern Health (pictured in 2nd photo from left to right): Machiel Mostert, Engagement Lead, Volunteer Resources; Ashley Pannozzo, Community Engagement Liaison, DCDH Replacment Project; and Byron Stewart, Northeast Recruitment and Retention Ambassador.

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  • Education, jobs, and career fair at Saulteau First Nations

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    On Tuesday, March 12, Saulteau First Nations and Muskoti Learning Centre hosted an education, jobs, and career fair and welcomed local job seekers, band members, and secondary school students from Chetwynd, Tumbler Ridge, and Hudson’s Hope.

    Attendees had the opportunity to engage with representatives from over 20 organizations to learn about their services, programs, and current or future employment opportunities.

    We were honored to be invited to this event to share information and answer questions about:

    • Job opportunities and career paths with Northern Health
    • The role that Indigenous Health plays in supporting Indigenous patients
    • Fun facts about the new Dawson Creek & District Hospital
    • Volunteer opportunities in the South Peace region

    Those who took some time to stop by the table and speak with us were also able to take a copy of the Grow Our Own booklet, Health Career Access Program (HCAP) brochure, a volunteer application form, the DCDH employment flyer, and the DCDH fact sheet.

    Attended this event on behalf of Northern Health (pictured from left to right): Logan Ritcher, Indigenous Care Coordinator, Chetwynd Hospital and Health Centre; Ashley Pannozzo, Community Engagement Liaison, DCDH Replacement Project; and Byron Stewart, Northeast Recruitment and Retention Ambassador.

    A little bit about Logan and her role as the Indigenous Care Coordinator:

    Logan was born and raised in Chetwynd and is a Saulteau First Nations member. She recently graduated from Douglas College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and returned to her hometown to begin working. Being passionate about Indigenous health care, she was hired for the Indigenous Care Coordinator (ICC) position at the Chetwynd Hospital and Health Centre in June 2023.

    In her role as the ICC, Logan works with Indigenous clients throughout their health care journey to support and educate them on services and supports that are available. She also works with staff members to incorporate traditional health practices into patient care and into the hospital’s spaces. Bridging the gap between western and traditional medicine is an extremely important aspect of her role.

    Logan finds her position with Northern Health Indigenous Health to be extremely rewarding because she is continuously learning about health care and the different aspects of patient care. She’s very excited to see what the future holds for roles similar to hers and how the Indigenous Health team will expand and grow.


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  • Mock-up #3 in the Quonset hut

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    Last week, Graham Design Builders LP submitted the 95% design and hosted the third round of mock-ups inside the Quonset hut.

    Read more about ‘what’s inside the Quonset hut’.

    Mock-up #3 consisted of a fully constructed bariatric inpatient bedroom and washroom and isolation room and anteroom. These rooms included sample materials and finishes, millwork locations, key pieces of equipment, IMIT device and power receptacle locations, and furniture. Leadership representatives were able to experience key features of the design, provide feedback and input, and make design decisions.

    In addition to the constructed rooms, they reviewed window blinds, the layout of a medication room and the layout of the LDRP washroom and birthing tub.

    Mock-up #4 will be a prototype of an inpatient bedroom and washroom and bariatric room which will include all materials, services, millwork, finishes, equipment and furniture. It’ll be constructed in its actual location within the new facility and reviewed at various stages of construction.

    Photos from inside the isolation room and anteroom

    Photos from inside the bariatric inpatient room and washroom

    Photos from inside the medication room

    Photos from inside the LDRP washroom with the birthing tub

    Photo of the window blinds review

    Mock-up #4 will be executed later this year and will be an in-situ prototype of an inpatient bedroom and washroom and bariatric room. Clinical users will be able to review the prototype room including all materials, services, millwork, finishes, equipment and furniture in its actual location within the facility at various stages of construction.

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  • Multi-trade rack mock-up in Coquitlam

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    On February 22 and 29, members from the DCDH PMO, Graham, HDR and subcontractor representatives attended an in-person mock-up review of a typical multi-trade rack in Coquitlam to provide feedback and discuss the pre-fabrication design.

    A multi-trade rack (MTR) is a steel frame structure that contains elements such as ductwork, water lines, heating pipes, sprinkler lines, valves, VAV boxes, steel studs and drywall, electrical components and anything else that is located in the ceiling of a corridor.

    Part of the project strategy is to pre-fabricate large components of the new Dawson Creek & District Hospital using MTRs. There will be approximately 90 in the new facility varying in size between 16’ to 24’ long.

    While in production, three MTRs will be built per week. Fabrication is done based on an established sequence of activities so as to facilitate assembly-line like production to maximize completion output.

    Once they are fabricated, the MTRs will undergo inspection and testing and then be shrink wrapped and shipped to Dawson Creek starting as early as July.

    Once the MTRs arrive on-site, they’ll be lifted up with the tower crane, rolled onto the floor into position, inspected again, hoisted up into the ceiling space, and then bolted to the underside of the suspended slab. Once they are installed, the two-foot gap between each one will be in-filled, inclusive of all the mechanical and electrical services and drywall.

    Pre-fabricating the MTRs off-site allows for them to be completed while work is still underway on the concrete superstructure as opposed to waiting until that work is complete. This method is also quicker, more cost effective, improves quality control, and is safer as it prevents workers having to work at heights.

    Note: Image is from another project showing the MTR being lifted by the crane


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  • Education and career fair at Tumbler Ridge Secondary School

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    On Thursday, February 15, Tumbler Ridge Secondary School (TRSS) hosted an education and career fair for their students in grades 10-12. Approximately 70 students had the opportunity to rotate through the tables and engage with local and regional organizations to learn about career paths and opportunities, current job openings, and education programs.

    On behalf of Northern Health, Ashley Pannozzo (DCDH Community Engagement Liaison), Byron Stewart (NE Recruitment & Retention Ambassador), and Machiel Mostert (Engagement Lead, Volunteer Resources) attended the event to share information about careers and volunteer opportunities with Northern Health as well as information about the new hospital being built just up the highway.

    Students were able to take a copy of the NH Grow Our Own booklet, Health Career Access Program brochure, DCDH employment flyer and DCDH quick facts flyer, ask questions and view draft renderings of the new facility.

    Several students expressed interest in exploring a career in healthcare and others expressed interest in working in trades with the construction of the new hospital. Overall, everyone was excited to hear about the new Dawson Creek & District Hospital and the benefits it will have on the South Peace region.

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  • Name those cranes!

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    If you’ve been to the Dawson Creek & District Hospital (DCDH), you might be familiar with Ken – a registered nurse that has worked in the emergency department and ambulatory care for several years. Many people from the South Peace region know and love Ken and have been recipients of his nursing care. He’s well-respected and a pillar of the DCDH family.

    If you know Ken, you’ll also know that he’s a Vancouver Canucks super-fan! He’s very passionate about his beloved Canucks and his community and sometimes wears his Canucks scrubs to work. He’s also very supportive and excited about the DCDH Replacement Project and posts regularly about the exciting progress being made on site.

    Ken recently made tribute to two hard-working pieces of equipment that have taken over the Dawson Creek skyline and play a crucial role in the construction of the new hospital – the tower cranes!

    Ken has “named those cranes!” based on the fact that they mirror the hard work and dedication of Canucks legends Henrik and Daniel Sedin. Ken identifies the larger crane as Hank (aka Henrik) since he is the “older” twin (only by six minutes!) and the smaller crane is Daniel.

    Interested in learning more about the important role that cranes play on construction sites? Check out these photos of Tower Crane 1 (aka Henrik) being installed.

    Check out this timelapse video of Tower Crane 2 (aka Daniel) being installed.

    Do you have a fun and creative name for the cranes? Comment below!

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  • Level 1 suspended slab pours

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    We’re excited to share that concrete pours for the Level 1 (L1) suspended slab are underway! The first pour was done on January 25 and the remaining pours will continue until mid-April. Once all 10 pours for L1 are complete, ~2510m3 of concrete will have been poured.

    Fun fact: Heidelberg Materials, Dawson Creek is supplying all of the concrete for the suspended slabs and CanaSteel Rebar Services, Dawson Creek is supplying and installing all the reinforcing steel.

    Suspended slabs are upper floor concrete slabs that are not in direct contact with the ground. The slab is supported on the exterior of the building by foundation walls and on the interior by concrete columns.

    In anticipation for the suspended slab pours, Graham had to complete the foundations that serve as the supporting structure of the slab. This installation involves:

    • Mudsill installation – Lumber used to support shoring. Mudsills distribute the shore load across an area big enough to not exceed the allowable soil bearing pressures.
    • Shore Installation – Vertical support designed to carry the weight of the formwork, reinforcing bar, concrete and live loads. All engineered to known and assumed loads. For DCDH, we are using an engineered tower system.
    • Beam Installation – Aluminum beams for horizontal formwork that are supported by the shores.
    • Joist Installation – Horizontal formwork installed perpendicular to and supported by the beams. The form facing material (plywood) is placed directly on the joists.
    • Formwork installation – The sheathing or plywood as mentioned above is what the concrete will be placed against.

    For the most part, the shoring is built in place. The beam, joist and formwork are pre-assembled as much as possible and flown in place using one of the two tower cranes on site. Infills are then completed after the prefabricated pieces are installed.

    The L1 suspended slab formwork is a tower system, so after the slab section has been poured, the beam, joists, and formwork will be removed and used on future pours. The shores will be lifted and individual reshore posts will be placed for the duration of all of the suspended slab pours for all levels.

    As usual, there is a lot of preparation work that goes into the suspended slab pours beforehand. In addition to engineering and picking an appropriate system, extensive planning for heating and hoarding is required to ensure the concrete cures properly. For suspended slabs, heating comes from the bottom which allows the concrete to be placed and finished and then the top of the slab is covered with tarps to keep the concrete at the right temperature and prevent moisture evaporation.

    The size of the pours are also pre-planned to accommodate:

    • Concrete supply capabilities – Slab sizes are based on the amount of concrete that can be received in a 6-to-8-hour window
    • Reinforcing steel laps and layout – Splices in rebar can impact structural integrity and increase loads outside of design parameters
    • Engineered control and expansion joints – Allow for shrinkage or movement
    • Crew availability and floor requirements – Levelness, flatness and finishes all have different levels of support and manpower required
    • Ambient air temperature, heating and hoarding

    The Level 2 and Level 3 suspended slabs consist of 18 pours (9 per level) totalling over 5000m3 (2500m3 per level) of concrete. Level 2 is anticipated to occur from March to May and Level 3 is anticipated from April to July.


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  • A Project Update: January 2024

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    Project status update

    Where we’re at

    Since our last update, work has been progressing well on the site of the new hospital – partially thanks to the mild weather we had heading into the holiday season!

    During October, detailed excavation was completed and over 2,200m3 (about the volume of an Olympic-size swimming pool) of concrete was poured.

    During November, construction activities transitioned to vertical components such as elevator cores, columns, and foundation walls. The second tower crane was also installed – check out this timelapse video of the process.

    During December, work began on foundation walls, interior columns, gas and electrical set up for site heating, and backfill of deep foundations.

    In addition, Graham prepared for the winter months by implementing their frost protection, ground heating and new temperature monitoring systems.

    What’s next

    Over the coming months, construction activities will continue to focus on the concrete superstructure and work has just begun on the level 1 structural suspended slab.

    In March, we will receive and review the formal 95% design submission and host the third round of mock-ups in the Quonset hut.

    Engagement initiatives

    Display at NLC’s Open House

    On Saturday, November 4, Northern Lights College hosted an Open House for community members to tour the campus and learn about their programs.

    Attendees were able to learn about the project as well as current and upcoming employment opportunities at DCDH and across the Northern Health region.

    Other exciting news

    Employment opportunities

    Start your journey with Northern Health at the newest hospital in the Northeast! There are a number of positions that need to be filled at the current and future hospital ranging from clinical, support services, administration, and more!

    Download a copy of the DCDH Employment Flyer to share with your extended network. View current job opportunities with Northern Health.

    Construction camera

    Curious to see what progress is being made on the construction of the new hospital? Check out the DCDH Construction Camera.

    Any day, any time you can see a live snapshot, zoom in and out and side to side, compare photos from different days, go back in time for archived snapshots, and view monthly timelapses.

    Interested in learning more?

    Visit Let’s Talk DCDH

    The Dawson Creek & District Hospital Replacement Project’s Let’s Talk site is our one-stop shop for everything related to the project. On the site, you can find:

    • Key details and important information
    • Regular project updates
    • Draft renderings
    • Photos of construction progress
    • Engagement highlights
    • Downloadable resources

    Here are some stories, photos, videos and documents that have been shared recently:

    By registering for Let’s Talk DCDH, you can share your thoughts on the project by commenting on recent stories or you can ask questions directly to the project team through the Q&A tool.

    Contact us directly

    Reach out to Ashley Pannozzo, our Community Engagement Liaison Officer, for the Dawson Creek and District Hospital Replacement Project at LetsTalkDCDH@northernhealth.ca.

    Photo from: January 14, 2024 | Temperature: L -43° H -36°

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  • DCDH ranked #92 on 2024 Top100 Projects

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    With an investment value of approximately $590 million, the DCDH project is ranked #92 on the list of the top 100 biggest infrastructure projects in the country.

    The 2024 Top100 Canada's Biggest Infrastructure Projects Report is an annual report published by ReNew Canada, an infrastructure magazine that ranks and profiles the country’s largest public infrastructure projects.

    Upon completion, the new hospital will be more than 25% bigger than the current facility – strengthening existing services and supporting increased access to care for all Northeast residents.

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Page last updated: 02 Apr 2024, 03:46 PM